From the cutting room floor.

Admit it, we all hate the feeling of rejection, whether it is in our personal life or our work environment. The type of rejection I am referring to stems from self-doubt - that niggling little voice inside our heads, the double guessing and constantly questioning ourselves type of rejection.

Spending many years in creative industries, rejection and self-doubt have become frequent visitors - a bit like that relative that always visits at the worst time and is hard to get rid of and it effects everything I do. Many ideas have started off great in my head only to find that when they are in front of me that little voice gets louder and I become disheartened which leads to me instantly rejecting them.

But there is another voice - the one that reminds me that some of the negatives along the way have really been valuable lessons (sometimes hiding in deep, deep camouflage), they can result in a new technique or result or just a lesson on what not to do next time. 

If you have been following my blog you would know I recently styled and photographed a campaign for Neon Poodle. I took hundreds, actually it was definitely over 1000 images! Out of those I chose only 45 to be worthy of the final cut. I am very critical of myself and it could be argued that I am just a perfectionist that knows what I am looking for, or maybe it is just a part of my creative process - the many layers that get me to that final perfect image, but deep down I know that there is something more sinister at play.

45/1000 - obviously there are many images that did not make the cut. Some of the images head straight to digital photo heaven and some I keep in the ‘maybe’ folder because I am just not sure.

Recently I pulled out one of these ‘maybe’ images for my Instagram page and little could I know that this ‘maybe’ image would get so much attention on my Instagram feed - to date it is the most liked image I have ever put up.

penny-lonie-brisbane-photographer-neon-poodle-cloud

My rejected image has become my most popular images and yet, I still don’t think it’s one of my best images. This makes me start to wonder; was it a case of that little voice of telling me that it wasn’t good enough and if so, how many other great images have I talked myself out of showing?

The self-rejection is something I have become more aware of since starting on this new vocation and like all problems the first step to fixing them is to acknowledge that you have them.

So, this is a timely reminder that although we can be super critical of ourselves yet others may see us differently. It sounds simple, yet it is a tough lesson and one I had to learn.

Everyone has an opinion based on their own perception and experiences and if I am to survive this industry then I need to be authentic, stay true to myself and learn to shut out that voice of self-doubt and rejection and until I can do it on my own, I am lucky enough to have a great group of supportive women, my own personal cheer squad who are happy to help me out!